LOEWE announces limited-edition art T-shirts to benefit Visual Aids

LOEWE presents a small series of T-shirts featuring works by the iconic American artist, writer, filmmaker and activist David Wojnarowicz (1954 - 1992).

Wojnarowicz became a protagonist of the vibrant local art scene after settling in Manhattan’s East Village in 1978. Many of his works incorporate outsider experiences drawn from his personal history as a gay man. After being diagnosed with AIDS, Wojnarowicz’ art took on a vocal political stance, producing some of the most important and challenging work around the AIDS crisis of the 1980s. His scathing honesty earned the ire of federal authorities, and his work continues to spark controversy and inspire in our own time of growing cultural divisions around critical social issues concerning freedom, justice and equality.


Click for updates on David Wojnarowicz and future launches

Continuing its collaboration with the David Wojnarowicz estate, the LOEWE Foundation marks its 8th participation in the annual photography festival PHotoEspaña, with a special exhibition devoted to Peter Hujar and David Wojnarowicz.

Find out more about the exhibition from June 4 to August 30 2018 in LOEWE Gran Via Gallery Madrid

Coinciding with the exhibition, LOEWE presents the latest entry in the ‘LOEWE Conversations’ series with writer, humorist, cultural commentator and Hujar´s closest friend Fran Lebowitz, who will be in conversation with New York art dealer Gracie Mansion.

Watch the full conversation between Fran Lebowitz and Gracie Mansion focusing on the Manhattan political and art scene during the 1970’s and 1980’s as a special homage to the Stonewall riots (1969), origin of the Gay Pride.
 

LOEWE announces limited-edition art T-shirts to benefit Visual Aids

LOEWE presents a small series of T-shirts featuring works by the iconic American artist, writer, filmmaker and activist David Wojnarowicz (1954 - 1992).

Wojnarowicz became a protagonist of the vibrant local art scene after settling in Manhattan’s East Village in 1978. Many of his works incorporate outsider experiences drawn from his personal history as a gay man. After being diagnosed with AIDS, Wojnarowicz’ art took on a vocal political stance, producing some of the most important and challenging work around the AIDS crisis of the 1980s. His scathing honesty earned the ire of federal authorities, and his work continues to spark controversy and inspire in our own time of growing cultural divisions around critical social issues concerning freedom, justice and equality.

Click for updates on David Wojnarowicz and future launches

LOEWE creative director Jonathan Anderson conceived the project to foster awareness and honour Wojnarowicz’ seminal legacy as a courageous creator/activist, selecting 4 works made by the artist between 1982 and 1990 as prints to go on high-grade cotton crewneck T-shirts in a limited run of under 400 per design.

The totality of sales proceeds from the project will be donated to Visual AIDS. Founded in 1988 to preserve and promote the work of H.I.V.-positive artists, Visual AIDS is committed to raising AIDS awareness and creating a dialogue through visual art exhibitions and publications. The organisation also assists artists living with HIV/AIDS.

Shop the collection

Continuing its collaboration with the David Wojnarowicz estate, the LOEWE Foundation marks its 8th participation in the annual photography festival PHotoEspaña, with a special exhibition devoted to Peter Hujar and David Wojnarowicz.

Find out more about the exhibition from June 4 to August 30 2018 in LOEWE Gran Via Gallery Madrid

Coinciding with the exhibition, LOEWE presents the latest entry in the ‘LOEWE Conversations’ series with writer, humorist, cultural commentator and Hujar´s closest friend Fran Lebowitz, who will be in conversation with New York art dealer Gracie Mansion.

Watch the full conversation between Fran Lebowitz and Gracie Mansion focusing on the Manhattan political and art scene during the 1970’s and 1980’s as a special homage to the Stonewall riots (1969), origin of the Gay Pride.

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